"Every person can transform the world

from one of monotony and drabness to 

one of excitement and adventure."

WHY DIVE BLUE HORIZON...

OUR GREAT TEAM OF INSTRUCTORS HAVE A PASSION THAT IS INFECTIOUS TO OTHERS AND SHOWS THAT IT COULD BECOME AN INCREDIBLE WAY OF LIFE ! 

Dive Blue Horizon is a

excellent team of divers,

with passion and years of

experience from a

recreational to a technical

background...

DIVING IN SARDINIA

AS THE MEDITERRANEAN’S PREMIER DIVING DESTINATION, GORGEOUS, ITALIAN SARDINIA ATTRACTS ALL LEVELS OF DIVERS WANTING TO EXPLORE ITS MAZE-LIKE CAVES, HISTORICAL WRECKS AND FASCINATING UNDERWATER LIFE.

DIVING IN SARDINIA-QUICK FACTS

Sardinia is often described as containing the best diving in Italy and perhaps the best throughout the Mediterranean. Technical divers love the area’s caves, history-lovers are fascinated by the wrecks and beginners can ease into the water on a variety of shore dives. Most of the diving takes place on the east coast, because the west side of the island is exposed to the prevailing south westerly winds. In addition, the marine protected areas of the Archipelago of the Maddalena and the Marine Park of Lavezzi offer plentiful marine life.

The most visited of Sardinia’s dive sites is the Grotta del Nereo, a series of caves and tunnels reaching over 1150 feet (350 meters). There are 3 used entrances to the cave. Two are quite shallow while one is at 100 feet (30 meters). Divers often utilize the deeper entrance and swim through the chimney, exiting through one of the shallower openings. Slipper lobsters, octopus, red coral, nudibranchs and the largest mussel species in the world, the Pinna nobilis fan mussel, can all be found here.

Other dives around the island include: The KT, a 213-foot (65-meter) long German ship which sank in 1943 and sits at 65-115 feet (20-35 meters); The Angelica, a Japanese tanker which sank in 1982 and sits at 65 feet (20 meters); The Cogliano, an 8,000 ton Italian freighter which sank in World War II and sits at 52-62 feet (16-19 meters); and Grouper Reef, home to a colony of 50 territorial groupers weighing 66-88 pounds (30-40kg).

Sardinia experiences a typical Mediterranean climate with hot summers and humid winters. During the summer months, water temperatures climb to 82°F (26°C), but there is often a thermocline at approximately 40 feet (12 meters) where the temperature drops to about 59°F (15°C). During the winter months, water temperatures tend to hover around 54°F (12°C) and most marine life disappears. In the right season, Sardinia is a diver’s paradise with crystal clear water and fascinating dive sites to explore.

Sardinia is a land of friendly people, ancient ruins and excellent diving.

You can dive all year round in Sardinia. In the summer there is a thermocline around 12 m where temperatures drop to 15 oC or so. In winter temperatures are around 13 oC but this rises to 24 oC in September. July and August are high season. Avoid these months if at all possible: accommodation prices are often double. May, June and September are good months to go. The sea is warm in October (21 oC) but thunder storms possible.

There is diving all round the island to suit every taste: caves, wrecks, corals, crustaceans, etc. However, don't expect to see many large fish here.

The visibility can be excellent - 40 m - especially in May (although the water is cool then).